Coming Together

I love that stage in a project where random fabric pieces finally start looking like a wearable garment.  I tried on the Aragon Tunic this evening, and it is looking fabulous!  I really wish I could finish it tonight, but that just isn’t going to happen.  I could easily finish the tunic itself–there’s just the chain stitching around the neckline trim to do and weaving in some ends–but there is no way I’d be able to get the belt done, especially since I don’t think I have any ribbon on hand for the base of it.

One note about the pattern, before I move on to pictures: the trim pattern is very easy to follow, just as the rest of the pattern has been.  It’s the spacing of it that is difficult.  There are no guidelines as to how many sc stitches you should end up with around the neckline and sleeve edges (not only no exact number, but also no “multiples of…”).  If you are a perfectionist, you will want to break out  your calculator so that you can make things perfectly symetrical.  If you are like me, you fudge a bit–an extra space here, scrunch things up a bit there, and it works.

Note two: the sleeve edges as patterned will not turn out looking like the ones in the photos.  It’s a very slight difference, and not one that I was willing to go back and change, but it is noticable.  In the photos, the sc’s and sl sts continue up the side edge of the trim.  The pattern does not give instructions for this.  In order to reproduce this look, I believe you would need to fasten off at the end of the cross stitch row, then tie on at the base of the first row, crochet up the dtr, across the top edge of the cross stitches, then back down the turning chain.  This would give you the foundation of sc stitches that you would need to do the decorative sl st around the entire design.  Of course, you’d also have to fasten off and start a new thread again for the final row of the edging.  Considering there are already a ton of ends to weave in, I’m not surprised that someone desided to nix these extra few.  Plus, it really does look fine without it.

Note three: At first I wasn’t crazy about the decorative slip stitch around the trim.  Trust me…you’ll want it.  The trim looks a little aenemic and flimsy without it.  Of course, this could have more to do with my yarn choice than anything else, but I definitely feel like it was worth the extra effort to add that detail.

And finally, if you are anything like me, you will need to remind yourself to add that second row of cross stiches to the bottom hem.  By the time I got to the hem, I was comfortable with the pattern and thought I knew what I was doing.  I was so gungho that  I got all the way throug the final row before realizing that I’d left out two rows of stitches (the cross stitch row and the accompanying sc row).  Eeep.

But now, for the pictures…

This first is just a shot of the front being blocked.

Blocking

Blocking

This next photo just shows the nearly finished Tunic folded up for storage.  You may be able to see that the sl st rows on the neckline haven’t been done yet.

The Folded Aragon Tunic

The Folded Aragon Tunic

And finally, the tunic on me.  Obviously, it still need the belt, but I’m already loving it.

Aragon Tunic...almost done.

Aragon Tunic...almost done.

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